In Focus:

Bullying: Help your child handle a bully

Bullying was once considered a childhood rite of passage. Today, however, bullying is recognized as a serious problem. To help your child handle bullying, learn to recognize it — and understand how to respond.

Types of bullying

 

Bullying is a form of aggression, in which one or more children repeatedly and intentionally intimidate, harass or harm a victim who is perceived as unable to defend him- or herself. Bullying can take many forms. For example:

  • Physical. This type of bullying includes hitting, tripping and kicking, as well as destruction of a child's property.
  • Verbal. Verbal bullying includes teasing, name-calling, taunting and making inappropriate sexual comments.
  • Psychological or social. This type of bullying involves spreading rumors about a child, embarrassing him or her in public, or excluding him or her from a group.
  • Electronic. Cyberbullying involves using an electronic medium, such as email, websites, a social media platform, text messages, or videos posted on websites or sent through phones, to threaten or harm others.
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