In Focus:

Belly fat in women: Taking — and keeping — it off

An expanding waistline is sometimes considered the price of getting older. For women, this can be especially true after menopause, when body fat tends to shift to the abdomen.

Yet an increase in belly fat does more than make it hard to zip up your jeans. Research shows that belly fat also carries serious health risks. The good news? The threats posed by belly fat can be reduced.

 

What's behind belly fat

 

Your weight is largely determined by how you balance the calories you eat with the energy you burn. If you eat too much and exercise too little, you're likely to carry excess weight — including belly fat.

However, aging also plays a role. Muscle mass might diminish slightly with age, while fat increases. Loss of muscle mass also decreases the rate at which your body uses calories, which can make it more challenging to maintain a healthy weight.

Read the whole article

More hot stories

Sex: Why Foreplay Matters

Whoever said the most important thing in life is to finish strong never had a frank conversation with a woman about the importance of foreplay. When it comes to sexual prelude, men and women don't always see eye to eye. As you ready yourself for slow, leisurely lovemaking, suddenly your evening turns into...

Read More

Self-Harm on the Rise Among Teen Girls

Teen girls are much more likely to self-harm than boys, and the dangerous practice is on the rise. That's the conclusion of a new British study that also found a strong link between self-harm -- practices such as cutting or burning oneself -- and a higher risk of suicide. Researchers reviewed information from...

Read More

How marriage might be linked to lower dementia risk

Your relationship status might be associated with your dementia risk, and a new research review paper reveals how. Dementia, a loss of brain function, usually occurs in older age. The most common type is Alzheimer's disease....

Read More