In Focus:

Heart benefit of alcohol not seen in people with liver disease

Light to moderate drinkers may have a lower risk of heart disease than teetotalers, but a new study suggests this doesn't hold true for people with fatty liver disease.

Most people have a little bit of fat in their liver, but fatty liver disease can be diagnosed when more than 5 percent of the liver by weight is made up of fat. If the condition isn't linked to liver damage from heavy drinking, it's known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and is most often associated with obesity and certain eating habits.

For the current study, researchers examined data on 5,115 adults aged 18 to 30, following them for up to 25 years to assess their drinking habits and check for evidence of fatty liver disease, heart disease or risk factors for cardiac problems.

"Heart disease is actually the leading cause of death in people with nonalcoho

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