In Focus:

A Hot Cup of Tea Preserve Your Vision

THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A spot of hot tea in the afternoon might help you save your sight, new research suggests.

The study of U.S. adults found that people who drank hot tea on a daily basis were 74 percent less likely to have glaucoma, compared to those who were not tea fans.

Experts were quick to stress that it may not be tea, itself, that wards off the eye disease. There could be something else about tea lovers that lowers their risk, said senior researcher Dr. Anne Coleman.

But the findings do raise a question that should be studied further, according to Coleman, a professor of ophthalmology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"Interestingly," she said, "it was only hot, caffeinated tea that was associated with a lower glaucoma risk."

Decaf tea and iced tea showed no relationship to the disease. Neither did coffee, caffeinated or not.

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