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Heavy Coffee Drinkers Show Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) — People who drink a lot of coffee may have a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), a new large study suggests.

Researchers found that among more than 6,700 adults, those who downed about six cups of coffee a day were almost one-third less likely to develop MS than non-drinkers were.

And the link was not explained away by factors such as people's age, education, or income levels, or smoking and drinking habits.

Still, experts stressed that the findings do not prove that coffee, or big doses of caffeine, fight MS.

Nor is anyone suggesting that people drink more java to ward off the disease, said lead researcher Anna Hedstrom, of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

She said the findings do add to evidence that coffee "may have beneficial effects on our health"—but there is no way to make any specifi

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