In Focus:

Male menopause is it real

Hormone changes are a natural part of aging. Unlike the more dramatic reproductive hormone plunge that occurs in women during menopause, however, sex hormone changes in men occur gradually. Here's what to expect, and what you can do about it.

Debunking the male menopause myth

 

The term "male menopause" is sometimes used to describe decreasing testosterone levels related to aging. Female menopause and so-called male menopause are two different situations, however.

In women, ovulation ends and hormone production plummets during a relatively short period of time. In men, production of testosterone and other hormones declines over a period of many years and the consequences aren't necessarily clear.

 

So what's the best way to refer to so-called male menopause? Many doctors use the term "andropause" to describe aging-related hormone changes in men. Other terms include testosterone deficiency syndrome, androgen deficiency of the aging male and late-onset male hypogonadism.

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