In Focus:

New dad: Tips to help manage stress

Becoming a father can be an exciting and overwhelming experience. As a new dad, however, you can take steps to prepare for the emotions and challenges of fatherhood and connect with your newly expanded family. Understand how to make your transition to fatherhood less stressful and more fulfilling.

 

Recognize sources of stress

 

No one said taking care of a newborn would be easy. As a new dad, you might worry about:

  • Limited paternity leave. If you aren't able to take time off when the baby is born, it might be difficult to keep up your regular work schedule and find time to spend with your newborn.
  • New responsibilities. Newborns require constant care. On top of feedings, diaper changes and crying spells, parents must find time to do household chores and other activities. This can be stressful for new parents who are used to a more independent lifestyle.
  • Disrupted sleep. Newborns challenge their parents' ability to get a good night's sleep. Sleep depri

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