In Focus:

Toxic Extract Used in Poison Arrows Could Be The Future of Male Contraception

Scientists have identified a chemical that could be suitable for a male contraceptive pill in a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows.

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of Kansas say ouabain, a toxic substance derived from two kinds of African plants – and also produced in mammals in lower amounts – could serve as the basis for a working male pill.

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