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Experimental therapy could boost stroke recovery

An experimental therapy being tested by University of Alberta scientists that targets the spinal cord may one day be key to spurring on enhanced recovery for stroke victims.

By injecting a drug called chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) into the spinal cord of rats 28 days after they suffered a stroke, researchers found they were able to enhance recovery by inducing amplified rewiring of circuits connecting the brain to the spinal cord. When they also combined the spinal therapy with rehabilitative training, recovery amplified further.

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