In Focus:

Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport

A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney.

The study, conducted in collaboration with Swimming Australia and published in the Journal of Science and Sports Medicine, examined the representation of over 6000 athletes at the National Swimming Championships between 2000 and 2014.

It found those born earlier in the age category cut-offs were much more likely to be involved at 12-14 years, however by 17-18 years this had completely reversed with an over-representation of relatively younger swimmers.

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