In Focus:

You can Get the Flu Twice in One Season

There's a lot of time during flu season to dodge germs. Influenza activity peaks from December to February, but it can easily stretch from November (or earlier) to March (or later). So if you had the flu already this year, you might feel like at least you got your turn out of the way.

Except it doesn't exactly work that way. During these long flu season months, you could get the flu a second time. Yep, really.

That’s because—stay with us here—there are four different types of the flu: influenza A, B, C, and D. Influenza A and influenza B cause the seasonal epidemics we've come to expect in the fall and winter, and there are different strains of each. When you get sick from one particular strain of flu virus, your body develops an immune response that will protect you from getting re-infected with the very same bug. "Your likelihood of getting the same flu again is lower," explains Denise Pate, MD, internal medicine physician with Medical Offices of Manhattan. "Ho

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